Author: Ian Ramjohn

Author: Ian Ramjohn

Recent news from Wiki Education

Ensuring Wikipedia represents the accomplishments of women scientists

In 2012, Dr. Jennifer Doudna helped make one of the most remarkable breakthroughs in biology — the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system, which changed editing genomes from science fiction to science. Before Dr. Laura Hoopes started working to improve it as part of Wiki Education’s professional development program, Dr. Doudna’s Wikipedia biography looked pretty substantial. With over 1400 … Continued

Seeing yourself in the world

I was born in a time of revolution. But once I was old enough to understand, the failed uprising was just a story told by parents and referenced in newspaper stories; it was absent from both the books we read in school and the works of local historians I borrowed from the library. Somewhere along … Continued

Welcome, Elysia Webb!

I’m thrilled to announce that we’ve hired Elysia Webb as Wiki Education’s newest Wikipedia Expert. Elysia joins existing Wikipedia Experts Ian Ramjohn and Shalor Toncray as they support newcomers to Wikipedia in making high-quality contributions as part of Wiki Education’s programmatic offerings. As a Wikipedia Expert, Elysia monitors and tracks contributions by program participants, answers … Continued

Sex in the Tree of Life

The demarcations of human sexuality have become a major issue in the culture wars, but for plants, sexual diversity is the norm. There are plants with “perfect” flowers that are completely hermaphroditic, with fully functional pollen and eggs produced in the same flower. There are monoecious plants, which produce both male and female flowers. There … Continued

Students, Sources, and Sentinels at AAAS

In February, Boston played host to thousands of scientists, policy makers and journalists who attended the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The conference took place against a background of mounting concern in the scientific community about the future of science during the new presidential administration. While the conference … Continued