Category: Communicating Science

Category: Communicating Science

Recent news from Wiki Education

Can “behavior” exist absent a brain or nervous system?

Spring in the northern Temperate zone brings an effusive burst of life. Flowers and leaves appear on trees and shrubs from seemingly dead branches, while non-woody perennials emerge from the ground as if from hiding. The burst of flowers and the flush of leaves seems almost miraculous — one day it’s all brown, the next … Continued

Sharing ecological expertise through Wikipedia

Kaitlin Farrell, Ph.D. teaches and coordinates undergraduate labs in the Odum School of Ecology at the University of Georgia. She is also a member of the team that started WikiProject Limnology & Oceanography. Ecological research, like many other fields, is often shared through peer-reviewed journals, whose articles can be locked behind paywalls. In addition, such … Continued

Real-world learning of biological systematics

Kris White an Assistant Professor in the Biological and Environmental Sciences Department at Georgia College & State University. In all of the Biology courses that I teach, I strive to show students how the material is relevant to their every day lives. Most recently I taught a Biological Systematics course to upper level Biology majors, … Continued

Science communication and equity on Wikipedia

The American Physical Society (APS) sponsors instructional courses through Wiki Education to help increase the accessibility of physics information and research online. Their dedication to communicating science with the public is easily supported by the Wikipedia platform and Wiki Education courses, which invite scholars and scientists to take part in increasing the quality of information … Continued

Celebrating Ada Lovelace Day with Wikipedia

Today is Ada Lovelace Day, honoring women in STEM. Named after Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, who is widely considered to be one of the first computer programmers. Improving Wikipedia’s coverage of women in STEM has been an ongoing theme around Ada Lovelace Day. In the 10 years we’ve been supporting student editors through our Wikipedia Student … Continued

How a Wiki Scholar improved a Nobel laureate’s biography

We awoke this morning to the exciting news that the Nobel Prize for Chemistry was awarded today to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna for their work on CRISPR. It’s exciting to see this amazing discovery recognized, and it’s great to see the prize go to women, but I was especially pleased that a participant in one … Continued

Another Wikipedian is cultivated

Dr. Pratima Gupta (she/her/hers) is an Obstetrician/Gynecologist. She recently completed one of our Wiki Scholars courses sponsored by the Society of Family Planning, in which she learned how to add content to Wikipedia pages in her area of expertise. She practices in California with a professional emphasis on medical education and reproductive health rights, justice, and … Continued

What kind of source is Wikipedia?

Emma Oxford is a PhD Candidate in experimental high energy physics at Carnegie Mellon University. After taking our Wiki Scientists course sponsored by the American Physical Society, she has thoughts about how we might view Wikipedia as a “source”. Read what she means. As an APS member, I was fortunate to be able to enroll … Continued

Students document workplace health risks on Wikipedia amidst global pandemic

Are you familiar with occupational epidemiology? It’s the study of whether working conditions are safe for workers. As workplaces determine whether or not it’s safe to open up facilities again and resume “normal” work amidst a global pandemic, organization leaders are ideally making these important decisions with science and employee safety in mind. Public health … Continued