Category: Student learning outcomes

Category: Student learning outcomes

Recent news from Wiki Education

Empowering millions by ensuring the future of facts

Representing knowledge accurately and extensively for the public is integral to Wikipedia’s mission and that of Wiki Education. Millions of people look to Wikipedia to make political and behavioral decisions in their lives, so we’re taking purposeful steps to improve the site’s coverage of subject areas like public policy, political science, law, history, environmental science, and sociology. … Continued

Students find education to be worth the cost when coursework is relevant to their lives

The more relevant coursework is to a student’s life or career, the more they will agree that their education has been worth the cost. Strada and Gallup released a study last month, From College to Life: Relevance and the Value of Higher Education, which seeks to understand students’ perspectives on the value of their higher education. … Continued

A student reflects on her Wikipedia success

Jane Lee, a student in Dr. Joan Strassmann’s Behavioral Ecology course at Washington University in St. Louis, vastly improved a Wikipedia article about the Small heath butterfly species last fall. She added 4,723 words and went into depth about the butterfly’s taxonomy, life cycle, habitat, and behavior. And her work has been viewed more than 1,000 times by curious … Continued

“Don’t cite it, write it!” Why teaching students to improve Wikipedia is valuable

Dr. Zach McDowell, Assistant Professor of Communications, gave a talk on March 2 as part of the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Learning Sciences Research Institute Speaker Series. In his talk, “Don’t Cite it, Write it! Student Learning Outcomes and the Wikipedia Assignment,” Dr. McDowell walks through how a Wikipedia assignment works, what tools and support Wiki … Continued

Fostering inclusion in academia, Wikipedia, and beyond

By improving Wikipedia as a classroom assignment, students increase the public’s access to previously inaccessible knowledge, and improve Wikipedia’s coverage of underrepresented topics. And in the process, they learn about their own privilege to information as a university student as well as the social and historical forces at work regarding the sharing and recording of … Continued

What happens to a student’s motivation when their work has an impact beyond the classroom?

“Pseudotransactionality is the practice of having students pretend to write a letter to an employer, a newspaper article, or even a tweet” to situate their learning in ‘real-life’ contexts, writes Dr. Kathleen Sheppard, an instructor in our program. “It’s a real process, but with an artificial end. Students know this, so they tend not to work … Continued

Achieving student learning objectives with a Wikipedia assignment

The Stanford Graduate School of Education published a study in 2016 that found that young people have trouble when it comes to “civic online reasoning.” Researchers defined the phrase in terms of students’ ability to identify credible sources online, to distinguish advertisements from news articles, and to understand where information came from. The study reports that despite … Continued

Incorporating global perspectives into an Information Science course

Dr. Edward Benoit, III is Assistant Professor in the School of Library and Information Science at Louisiana State University. In the Fall 2017 term, he taught with Wikipedia in an online, general education course. Here, he reflects on the experience. I first encountered the notion of a Wikipedia assignment in the summer of 2017. I … Continued

The Future of Facts: Informing and engaging citizens through Wikipedia

In the age of fake news and the sheer volume of information on the Internet, having trustworthy digital resources is more important than ever. We no longer turn to publishers, subject matter experts, or even news outlets for most of our information – we look to Wikipedia. But even one of our most relied upon sources of … Continued

Reaching consensus and informing citizens through a Wikipedia assignment

Dr. J. Wesley Leckrone is Associate Professor of Political Science at Widener University. Here, he reflects on teaching with Wikipedia in a public policy course. Two years ago at the Midwest Political Science Association (MPSA) Annual Conference I walked by an exhibit that piqued my interest. The MPSA and Wiki Education had partnered to engage … Continued