Category: Student learning outcomes

Category: Student learning outcomes

Recent news from Wiki Ed

Welcome, Mahala Stewart!

Over the past few months, we’ve been conducting research to evaluate student learning outcomes of Wikipedia-based assignments. I’m pleased to announce Mahala Stewart has joined Wiki Education as a Research Assistant to analyze and interpret survey and focus group data. She will work closely with Research Fellow Zach McDowell, who has been leading the project. … Continued

Five reasons you should donate to Wiki Education on Giving Tuesday

Today is Giving Tuesday, a U.S. holiday to encourage donations to worthy nonprofits. If you’re planning to make financial contributions this year, we hope you’ll consider supporting Wiki Education. Here’s why: 1. We’re dramatically improving the availability and accuracy of information available on Wikipedia. Since 2010, students in our program have added 25 million words … Continued

Wikipedia: A field trip to the public sphere

We’ve been talking all year about how Wikipedia is a platform for the public communication of science. Student editors have contributed nearly 2,500 science articles to Wikipedia so far this year. Those have been seen more than 80 million times. Most of those courses are researching science topics, and contributing to the articles about those … Continued

Evaluating student learning through Wikipedia

A goal of higher education is to ensure that students learn information that enriches their lives and their careers. As an instructor in higher education, I want to make sure we’re developing the critical skills that ensure future success. Students must master a new set of skills to prepare them for the world beyond their classroom. … Continued

Why Wikipedia assignments work for digital literacy

University undergraduates may be tech-savvy, but that doesn’t always mean they’re digitally literate. It’s easy to mistake frequent use of new media for an understanding of media literacy. But that’s a bit like saying you can learn Japanese just by showing up in Tokyo. Like any form of literacy, understanding media requires not just exposure, … Continued