Category: Society of Family Planning

Category: Society of Family Planning

Recent news from Wiki Education

An unusual place to find community

Dr. Azmina Bhayani is family physician. She recently completed one of our Wiki Scholars courses sponsored by the Society of Family Planning. She practices in New York City and is particularly interested in reproductive health and medical education.  Community means different things to different people. Wikipedia says community is “a social unit…with commonality such as … Continued

Another Wikipedian is cultivated

Dr. Pratima Gupta (she/her/hers) is an Obstetrician/Gynecologist. She recently completed one of our Wiki Scholars courses sponsored by the Society of Family Planning, in which she learned how to add content to Wikipedia pages in her area of expertise. She practices in California with a professional emphasis on medical education and reproductive health rights, justice, and … Continued

Family planning doesn’t stop during a pandemic, so neither do the experts

We’re all quickly learning that in a global pandemic, non-COVID-related healthcare looks very different from what we were accustomed to. This is a new age of telehealth, where people access health services through communication technologies rather than in-person visits. As we hear from our Society of Family Planning (SFP) Wiki Scholars, a group of reproductive … Continued

Why members of the Society of Family Planning are getting involved with Wikipedia

Wikipedia is the most popular internet health content, more than NIH, Web MD, Mayo Clinic, and other sources (according to a 2014 study). Doctors use it. Patients use it. Policy makers use it.   Thus, the volunteers who curate Wikipedia’s content take the quality of medical articles very seriously. But keeping content accurate, complete, and … Continued

Improving medical Wikipedia pages as an expert and a consumer

“It feels really powerful to have a forum to reach this many people and to provide them with potentially helpful information. I certainly don’t reach this many people during direct patient care or through publications in medical journals.”   Everyone uses Wikipedia. Even our doctors.¹ So doesn’t it make sense to invite medical professionals into … Continued

Meeting your patients where they are: on Wikipedia

“Our patients are using Wikipedia for their health questions, so the more health professionals we have editing, the better and safer information they get.”* What would the world look like if everyone had unfettered access to knowledge? Free knowledge resources like Wikipedia provide an opportunity to put power into the hands of everyone. The Society … Continued

Ugandans writing their own story of family planning

Wikipedia aspires to collect and distribute the sum of human knowledge, but systemic barriers prevent the realization of this goal. Barriers to editing Wikipedia are highest in the Global South, where internet access can be sporadic or nonexistent, and people have less leisure time to contribute as unpaid labor. The entire continent of Africa (1.2 … Continued

Ask Alice? Not about medical content!

Would you trust a university’s advice column to provide trustworthy medical content? Probably not. And while Wikipedia policies require high-quality sources for medical articles, the guidelines aren’t always followed, and there are too few volunteers editing medical topics to keep all such articles at a high standard. That’s why the article for the medical procedure tubal … Continued