Category: Spring 2017

Category: Spring 2017

Recent news from Wiki Education

Students translating Wikipedia articles expand coverage of South American colonial history

Wikipedia articles are written and maintained by volunteers, all of whom have differing areas of interest and expertise. Volunteers have varying access to source material, so academic sources, that are often restricted behind paywalls, aren’t well represented on the site. Sometimes, however, sources for a particular topic are plenty, but they’re in another language. That’s … Continued

Putting it all together: details of a Wikipedia assignment

John Kleefeld taught with Wikipedia in Spring 2017 as associate professor at University of Saskatchewan’s College of Law. He has since joined the University of New Brunswick faculty as dean of law. This is a republication of his reflections about a Wikipedia assignment, originally published at the conclusion of his Spring 2017 course on the University of Saskatchewan’s … Continued

How students can help inform the public about conservation

When students learn to edit Wikipedia as a course assignment, they make research available to a worldwide audience and improve a resource that millions use daily. Considering that people look to Wikipedia to make behavioral and political decisions, ensuring that the information they find is accurate is an important task. Students have done some great work … Continued

Increasing Wikipedia’s coverage of women in STEM

Through our Communicating Science initiative, Wiki Education hopes to expand Wikipedia’s coverage of topic areas that fall under STEM. We are also committed to closing Wikipedia’s gender gap through our programs. These values come together in the improvement and creation of biography articles about women in STEM. Engaging students in editing these articles provides a beneficial experience for them, but also honors … Continued

When students write Wikipedia articles about law

Millions of users traffic Wikipedia every month, looking for information on a wide variety of topics. Many of those users then take that information into account when making political and behavioral decisions. That’s why Wiki Education is committed to improving Wikipedia’s coverage of topics relevant to an informed citizenry. Our Future of Facts initiative encourages participants in our … Continued

African-American legacies in art, economics, and politics

February is Black History Month, during which we reiterate the importance of achievements, contributions, and legacies of African-Americans throughout history. Wikipedia strives to be the sum of all human knowledge. While it’s an incredible source of information (and one that millions look to every day!), it can always be improved, especially when it comes to … Continued

What do students think of a Wikipedia assignment in the classroom?

Dr. Deborah Stine is a Professor of the Practice in Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. This last year, she taught with Wikipedia in two of her courses, Environmental Politics and Policy (Spring 2017) and Emerging Energy Policies (Fall 2017). Here, she shares how her students responded to the assignment. In February of 2016, I attended … Continued

Reaching consensus and informing citizens through a Wikipedia assignment

Dr. J. Wesley Leckrone is Associate Professor of Political Science at Widener University. Here, he reflects on teaching with Wikipedia in a public policy course. Two years ago at the Midwest Political Science Association (MPSA) Annual Conference I walked by an exhibit that piqued my interest. The MPSA and Wiki Education had partnered to engage … Continued

Contributing accurate medical information to Wikipedia

January happens to be Thyroid Awareness Month. If you heard this and went in search of thyroid information, you’d likely end up on Wikipedia. There, you’d find the article for thyroid disease, which was heavily expanded during Dr. Amin Azzam’s Fall 2016 course for fourth year medical students at UCSF. That article has been viewed 26,778 times since … Continued

Roundup: Eastern European Literature

If you had searched for the Hungarian novel, The Door, on Wikipedia before this year, you would have been disappointed with the lack of information. Now if you looked for it, you’d find the work of a student in Sibelan Forrester’s Spring 2017 course at Swarthmore College, Eastern European Prose. The student expanded the article to include … Continued