Category: Fall 2017

Category: Fall 2017

Recent news from Wiki Education

Learning to claim Wikipedia: Feminist pedagogy and praxis

This reflection on teaching with Wikipedia in the classroom as a feminist praxis is co-written by Dr. Ariella Rotramel and Wiki Education’s Cassidy Villeneuve. Dr. Rotramel is the Vandana Shiva Assistant Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at Connecticut College. She has reflected on her experience in our Classroom Program before, found here. Feminist pedagogy continues … Continued

A student reflects on her Wikipedia success

Jane Lee, a student in Dr. Joan Strassmann’s Behavioral Ecology course at Washington University in St. Louis, vastly improved a Wikipedia article about the Small heath butterfly species last fall. She added 4,723 words and went into depth about the butterfly’s taxonomy, life cycle, habitat, and behavior. And her work has been viewed more than 1,000 times by curious … Continued

Fostering inclusion in academia, Wikipedia, and beyond

By improving Wikipedia as a classroom assignment, students increase the public’s access to previously inaccessible knowledge, and improve Wikipedia’s coverage of underrepresented topics. And in the process, they learn about their own privilege to information as a university student as well as the social and historical forces at work regarding the sharing and recording of … Continued

A classroom assignment that “makes the world a better place”

Dr. Ben Karney was interviewed by Howard Blume on KPFK’s show Deadline LA in March, along with two of his doctorate students, as well as Wiki Education’s Deputy Director and Director of Programs LiAnna Davis. He had a lot to say about the nature of a Wikipedia assignment, and why, as a psychology professor, public scholarship like … Continued

How students are helping to curb misinformation, an interview with WMNF

Wiki Education’s Executive Director Frank Schulenburg was featured on listener-supported community radio station, WMNF, along with Laura Runge, a professor of English at the University of South Florida, and her student Elizabeth Ricketts. Laura is an instructor in our Classroom Program, and taught with Wikipedia in her course last fall, Jane Austen Bits to Bytes. In the … Continued

Writing for the lay public: medical students improve Wikipedia

Dr. Benjamin Wolozin is a Professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Neurology at the Boston University School of Medicine. In Fall 2017, he taught with Wikipedia in his course, Systems Pharmacology. Here, he shares what it was like incorporating a Wikipedia assignment into his curriculum for the first time. I am a professor of Pharmacology … Continued

What happens to a student’s motivation when their work has an impact beyond the classroom?

“Pseudotransactionality is the practice of having students pretend to write a letter to an employer, a newspaper article, or even a tweet” to situate their learning in ‘real-life’ contexts, writes Dr. Kathleen Sheppard, an instructor in our program. “It’s a real process, but with an artificial end. Students know this, so they tend not to work … Continued

Engaging media students in service learning through editing Wikipedia

Dr. Jessica Roberts is assistant professor of Journalism and Media Studies in the Department of Communication at Boise State University. Last semester, she incorporated a Wikipedia assignment into her Introduction to Media course. I have been using service learning in the journalism courses I teach at Boise State University for several years. Service learning is a … Continued

Students bring their passions to public fora through a Wikipedia assignment

Dr. Clare Talwalker is a Continuing Lecturer in International and Area Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Last term, she taught with Wikipedia in her course, Ethics and Methods for the Global Poverty and Practice Minor. Here, she reflects on the course and why she will continue to teach with Wikipedia in future GPP classes. … Continued

Achieving student learning objectives with a Wikipedia assignment

The Stanford Graduate School of Education published a study in 2016 that found that young people have trouble when it comes to “civic online reasoning.” Researchers defined the phrase in terms of students’ ability to identify credible sources online, to distinguish advertisements from news articles, and to understand where information came from. The study reports that despite … Continued