Category: Wiki Scientists

Category: Wiki Scientists

Recent news from Wiki Education

On becoming a Wiki Woman Scientist

Dr. Jyoti Patel is a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery at NYU School of Medicine. She recently completed our Wiki Scientists course with the New York Academy of Sciences. Growing up in the UK during the 70s, long before the Wikipedia era, I was fortunate to have received a completely free education. I … Continued

The value of being a Wiki Scientist

Within academic circles, Wikipedia is often looked down upon, and is not considered a credible source of information. Yet, it is one of the most widely visited websites in the world and is often the first link to pop up when you conduct a typical Google search of a topic. With much of scientific information … Continued

Wikipedia as a platform for Science Policy

Daniel Puentes is a Graduate Research Assistant at Michigan State University and recently completed our Wikipedia training course sponsored by the National Science Policy Network. Wikipedia is one of the most popular online resources for anyone to get information that they’re interested in learning. During election years, voters will use Wikipedia to read about different … Continued

Improving information about disability healthcare on Wikipedia

When Wikipedia is a first stop for individuals interested in developmental disability-related healthcare, isn’t it important that the information they find there be complete and accurate? Wikipedia is one of the places many individuals who lack knowledge about developmental disability issues turn to. Some healthcare practitioners consult the site and/or use it as a resource. … Continued

Early career scientists interested in science policy can make a difference

Wikipedia is where people turn when they want to learn about science. Whether looking for information about health care, climate change, a medical condition, nuclear energy, space exploration, drug side effects, or human biology, it’s often the first stop we look. It’s also where citizens find information they need to make informed political decisions, and … Continued

One big way to amplify your knowledge and make a change in the world

When scientists share their rigorous research beyond their niche communities, they help restore the public’s trust in science. Wikipedia reaches people who are looking for reliable information, and Wiki Education is working to make sure academics, researchers, and scientists have the opportunity to reach those readers. This year, we did this by partnering with the … Continued

Improving medical Wikipedia pages as an expert and a consumer

“It feels really powerful to have a forum to reach this many people and to provide them with potentially helpful information. I certainly don’t reach this many people during direct patient care or through publications in medical journals.”   Everyone uses Wikipedia. Even our doctors.¹ So doesn’t it make sense to invite medical professionals into … Continued

Meeting your patients where they are: on Wikipedia

“Our patients are using Wikipedia for their health questions, so the more health professionals we have editing, the better and safer information they get.”* What would the world look like if everyone had unfettered access to knowledge? Free knowledge resources like Wikipedia provide an opportunity to put power into the hands of everyone. The Society … Continued

Channeling passion into action: NSPN Wiki Scientists

“The public looks to Wikipedia to make informed political decisions. If I can make that information more accurate and complete, that’s a good use of my time.”   When the National Science Policy Network (NSPN) announced that they would be sponsoring a course with us for early career scientists to add science policy information to Wikipedia (in … Continued

Ugandans writing their own story of family planning

Wikipedia aspires to collect and distribute the sum of human knowledge, but systemic barriers prevent the realization of this goal. Barriers to editing Wikipedia are highest in the Global South, where internet access can be sporadic or nonexistent, and people have less leisure time to contribute as unpaid labor. The entire continent of Africa (1.2 … Continued